Future Scenarios – concluding cafe conversation with Stephen Peake

Future Scenarios – concluding cafe conversation with Stephen Peake

Hot Numbers Cafe, Gwydir Rd, Cambridge

Wednesday 5 July, Doors open at 7 pm   7.15 start – 9 pm

 

Zoe Svendsen will be in conversation with Stephen Peake, – senior lecturer in environmental technologies at the Open University.

 

As the end of Zoe’s official residency approaches, she would like to mark the end with a unique twist. As well as asking Stephen Peake:

 

What is the best possible economic structure for responding to climate change?

and what would it be like to live in this future system?

 

Zoe will present a sketch of a future scenario derived from all the previous café conversations and ask Stephen Peake to act as ‘respondent’ to the scenario and imagine what it might be to live in that world with both intended and unintended consequences.

 

Zoe has previously held café conversations with: Carolyn Steel, Chris Hope, Doina Petrescu, Joe Smith, Paul Mason , Frances Coppola and Ha-Joon Chang. Further details can be found here.

 

In addition, Cambridge Carbon Footprint will have a stand exhibiting a thermal imaging camera which reveals drafts and gaps in insulation together with information on Open eco homes – opening doors to low energy homes in Cambridge.

 

Free tickets can be booked on the Junction website

CULTURE & CLIMATE CHANGE: FUTURE SCENARIOS #2DEGREESFESTIVAL

14 JUNE 2017
CULTURE & CLIMATE CHANGE: FUTURE SCENARIOS
#2DEGREESFESTIVAL

Toynbee Studios
28 Commercial Street
E1 6AB
London
UK
T 020 7650 2350

7.30pm. £5.

An evening of imagining possible futures in light of climate change predictions.

A climate scenario is a collective act of imagining a possible future in systems involving both humans and nature. They have played a prominent role in climate research, policy and communication. However they tend to be dominated by the natural sciences and economics.

The Paris Agreement set a target of limiting average global temperature increases to 1.5°C. What does a climate scenario look like which takes this ambitious goal into consideration?

Join us for an evening dedicated to imaginative responses to Future Scenarios. Hear from the team who have developed the Climate Change in Residence programme and the four artists who embarked on the first experimental year-long networked residency on the topic of Future Scenarios. They are: Emma Critchley, Lena Dobrowolska, Teo Ormond-Skeaping and Zoë Svendsen.

You’ll be invited to consider a range of climate-changed futures and create your own best-case or worst-case future scenario.

This event is supported by The Open University OpenSpace Research Centre, The University of Sheffield School of Architecture, The Ashden Trust, Jerwood Charitable Foundation and the Grantham Centre for Sustainable Futures.

 

To book your ticket, please click here

FUTURE ECONOMIES: A CAFE CONVERSATION WITH FRANCES COPPOLA

Saturday 10 June, 12 noon to 1.30 pm

Artsadmin, Toynbee Studios, Toynbee Studios, 28 Commercial Street, E1 6AB

 

The event forms part of the Two Degrees Festival. It will begin with a structured interview, and evolve into a conversation. Zoë will invite Frances Coppola to envisage a future scenario in response to the questions:

What is the best possible economic structure for responding to climate change

and what would it be like to live in this future system?

The event is free and no advance booking is needed.

Future economies – a cafe conversation with Ha-Joon Chang

Monday 8 May at Hot Numbers, Gwydir St, Cambridge

Doors open at 7pm, starts 7.15 – 9 pm

Zoe Svendsen  will be in conversation with Ha-Joon Chang, economist and writer (including the best-selling 23 Things They Don’t Tell You About Capitalism), Reader in Economics at the University of Cambridge.

She will be asking the questions  ‘What is the best possible economic structure for responding to climate change? and what would it be like to live in this future system?’

This is a free event, tickets can be booked on line at the Junction, please click here

 

Future Economies – a Cafe conversation with Ross Jones, of Manchester University’s sustainability forum, the Living Lab .

Friday 17 March, 7 pm, HOME,  2, Tony Wilson Place, First St, Manchester M15 4FN

Please arrive by 7 pm at the foyer, to be taken up to the space for a 7.15pm start

Book your free place here

Zoë Svendsen (director of World Factory, HOME, December 2016) is now investigating alternative economics and our relationship to climate change. To do so, she is interviewing experts all over the UK – and you are invited to join the conversation. The evening will begin with a structured interview, and evolve into a conversation.

 

On the 17th March, Zoë Svendsen will be in conversation about the future of global production networks with Ross Jones, of Manchester University’s sustainability forum, the Living Lab .

Martin Hess, Senior Lecturer in Human Geography at the University of Manchester  and David Alderson, Senior Lecturer in English Literature  will respond.

Zoë will be asking the question:

What is the best possible economic structure for responding to climate change?

& what would it be like to live in this future system?

 

Exploring climate change scenarios is not only about the changed landscape and atmospheric conditions of those situations, but also invites the question ‘how to live’ and brings with it the opportunity to ask the question ‘how do we want to live’?

 

Future Economies: A Café Conversation with Joe Smith Professor of Environment and Society, The Open University

Future Economies: A Café Conversation at Cambridge University Centre Wine bar
Date: Thursday 23 March,
Time: Doors open 7 pm, for a 7.15 pm start until 9 pm
Place: Wine Bar, University Centre, Granta Place, Cambridge, CB2 1RU
Price: Free*
Zoë Svendsen will be in conversation with Joe Smith, Professor of Environment and Society, The Open University, Department of Geography, co-creator of the Stories of Change AHRC-funded project, and co-author of Culture and Climate Change: Narratives.

Future Economies: a cafe conversation with Doina Petrescu, Professor of Architecture, University of Sheffield

In Public Conversation – Tuesday 6 February 2017

7.30pm – 9.30pm
Blue Moon Café, Sheffield
Free Event, No RSVP

Future Economies: A Café Conversation

 

On Tuesday 6 February, Zoë will be in conversation with Doina Petrescu, Professor of Architecture, University of Sheffield, exploring the question of who we would be under conditions of an alternative economic future. Zoe will be asking the questions:

What is the best possible economic structure for responding to climate change?

& what would it be like to live in this future system?

Future Economies: a Café Conversation with Climate modeller, Chris Hope

Tuesday 30 January 2017, 7 – 9 pm Hot Numbers, Cambridge

Zoe Svendsen wil be talking policy and its consequences with Climate modeller Chris Hope, Cambridge Judge Business School asking the question  ‘What is the best possible economic structure for responding to climate change?& what would it be like to live in this future system?’

Exploring climate change scenarios is not only about the changed landscape and atmospheric conditions of those situations, but also invites the question ‘how to live’ and brings with it the opportunity to ask the question ‘how do we want to live’?

This is a free, bookable event – tickets can be booked through the Junction here

 

 

Future Economies: a Café Conversation with architect, lecturer and writer, Carolyn Steel

 

Tuesday 10 January 2017, 7-9 pm, Hot Numbers, Cambridge

Zoe Svendsen will be talking food, architecture and distribution systems with Carolyn Steel  author of The Hungry City, and creator of the concept of sitopia, asking the question ‘What is the best possible economic structure for responding to climate change?& what would it be like to live in this future system?’

 

This is a free, bookable event – tickets can be booked through the Junction here.

 

World Factory: The Politics

World Factory: The Politics

Friday 21 October: 4:00pm – 5:30pm

Main Dining Hall, University Centre, Granta Place Mill Lane

World Factory: The Politics is free to attend but booking is recommended.

An interdisciplinary discussion engaging with the real-world issues explored by the interactive theatre show World Factory. Featuring a panel of Cambridge experts, this discussion interlinks questions of ethics, fashion, environmental impacts, working conditions, migration and globalisation.

Short provocations will be given by the following speakers:

 

  • Dr Shana Cohen (Deputy Director of Woolf Institute; Stone Ashdown Director; Senior Research Associate in the Department of Sociology, University of Cambridge)
  • Professor Joe Smith (Professor of Environment and Society; Faculty of Social Sciences, The Open University)
  • Dr Bhaskar Vira ( Director, University of Cambridge Conservation Research Institute Reader in the Political Economy of Environment and Development, and Fellow of Fitzwilliam College)
  • Dr Brendan Burchell (Reader in the Social Sciences, Department of Sociology, University of Cambridge, Director of Cambridge Undergraduate Quantitative Methods Centre)
  • Anne Lally (Independent consultant, specializing in ethical global garment manufacturing)

This will then be followed by a Q&A session chaired by World Factory Director/ Designer Zoë Svendsen.

 

Speakers’ biogs:

Dr Shana Cohen

Dr Cohen has been engaged in both academic research and community-based work in Morocco, India, Egypt, Israel, England, and the US. Her research has focused on the transformation of the middle class and the politics of social action under neoliberalism, exploring how the constitution of identity intersects with economic insecurity and ideologies of human potential and social value. Shana’s current writing and research projects reflect her practitioner and academic trajectories – the first project involves rethinking local management of resources to improve frontline service effectiveness and the second, how grassroots social action indicates the emergence of a new political consciousness controverting management models and allocation of resources based on commodification of human potential and vulnerability. She is also the PI (with Ed Kessler, Founder Director of the Woolf Institute) on a comparative study of how the recession in Europe has affected trust between religious minorities in London, Paris, Berlin, and Rome.

Professor Joe Smith

All of Dr Smith’s research seeks to enhance understanding and action on global environmental change issues, and draws on work from across the social and political sciences. This breaks down into two main areas of research and commentary: 1. Global environmental change and culture, largely focused on broadcasting and digital media; 2. Contemporary environmental history and politics, including the politics of consumption.
His research tends to be collaborative, interdisciplinary and experimental. Throughout my career he has sought to combine ‘thinking’ and ‘doing’, and impact and engagement has been integral to my varied projects. I am Principle Investigator on two major AHRC funded projects: Earth in Vision and Stories of Change, and also convene the Mediating Change group which seeks to support research and practice at the intersection of culture and climate change. My other current area of research relates to the politics of food in post-socialist societies. These investigations are currently summarised by the title Quiet Sustainability. Past projects include Interdependence Day, which tested reframings and provocations around themes of globalisation and sustainability with a series of events and publications.

Dr Bhaskar Vira 

Dr Vira’s research interests centre on the changing political economy of development, especially in India; and on political ecology, focusing on forests, wildlife and landuse change and the social and political context for biodiversity conservation. His work on incentives for natural resource use and management deals with trade-offs and discourses relating to the concept of ecosystem services, and how this overlaps with poverty and human well-being, as well as values for biodiversity conservation. Research into the policy process in this sphere has included work as a Coordinating Lead Author with the Responses Working Group of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment and the UK National Ecosystem Assessment. His research on the political economy of development in India focuses on the distributional consequences of changes in the Indian urban and rural economy since the 1990s, with a particular interest in labour relations, as well as alternative strategies for land-use and the management of resources.

Anne Lally

Anne Lally is an independent consultant specializing in ethical supply chains and multi-stakeholder regulatory frameworks.  She works on strategy and policy issues pertaining to the garment industry – with groups such as Fair Wear Foundation, Fair Labor Association, Global Reporting Initiative, and Clean Clothes Campaign. In her previous life, Anne headed a national-level fair trade organisation in the US and spent time monitoring human rights issues at the UN in Geneva and New York.  She holds a Masters in International and Public Affairs from Columbia University.

 

Dr Brendan Burchell

Dr Burchell’s research interests include the effects of labour market experiences (e.g. job insecurity, work intensification, bankruptcy, unemployment) on psychological well-being. The social psychological effects of precarious employment and unemployment; Analysis of complex work and life histories data; Gender segregation, men’s and women’s life cycle and career; Emotional reactions to personal finances: “Financial Phobia”; Member of the Sociological Research Group and Individual in the Labour Market Reading group.

 

 

 

The Canteen will serve a Chinese buffet following the World Factory: The Politics, with prices starting from £3.40 before the evening performance of World Factory at Cambridge Junction.

 

World Factory will show at Cambridge Junction from 18-21 October, 7.30 pm, as part of Cambridge Festival of ideas. Book tickets here

 

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